Gai Yang Recipe | Epicurious

  • Make the fried shallots (hom law)

    Step 1

    Cut the shallots in half lengthwise, then slice them as thinly as possible in the direction of the grain of the shallot, aiming for slices 1 mm (1/32 in) thick. Take your time, as you are looking for an even thickness for the shallots to cook evenly. Using a Japanese mandolin makes the work easier.

    2nd step

    Line a large baking sheet (mold) with paper towel. Heat the vegetable oil in a large wok until it reaches 140°C (284°F) on a cooking thermometer. If you don’t have any, add a slice of shallot to the hot oil; if it begins to bubble and fry without immediately coloring, the temperature is correct.

    Step 3

    Add the remaining shallots to the hot oil and stir to prevent them from clumping. Maintain a constant oil temperature so the shallots are held at a light sizzle for about 12 minutes, or until they turn golden brown.

    Step 4

    Pass the shallots through a sieve (fine mesh strainer) over a heatproof dish to collect the oil. Shake the sieve, then transfer the shallots to the lined platter. Use two forks to gently separate the shallots into strands, separating them in a single layer on the paper. The shallots will darken and become crispier as they dry. You want them to dry and cool as quickly as possible to prevent them from getting too dark and bitter. It takes a bit of practice, but you’ll quickly realize how dark you want the shallots to be before straining.

    Step 5

    Let the fried shallots cool completely before storing them in an airtight container covered with a sheet of paper towel. Store in a cool, dry place for up to two weeks. Let the fragrant shallot oil cool completely before transferring it to a separate airtight container. It will keep in a cool, dry place for up to two months.

  • Make the fried garlic (gratiam jaw)

    Step 6

    In a pestle and mortar, pound the garlic into an even minced texture, resembling a somewhat coarse paste. Do this in batches so as not to overload the mortar.

    Step 7

    Line a large baking sheet (mold) with paper towel. Heat the vegetable oil in a large wok until it reaches 140°C (284°F) on a cooking thermometer. If you don’t have any, add a very finely chopped grain of garlic to the oil; if it begins to bubble and fry without immediately coloring, the temperature is correct.

    Step 8

    Add the remaining garlic to the oil and stir to prevent clumping. Maintain a steady oil temperature so the garlic is kept at a light sizzle for about 12 minutes, or until golden brown.

    Step 9

    Pass the fried garlic through a sieve (fine mesh strainer) over a heatproof dish to collect the oil. Shake the sieve, then transfer the fried garlic to the lined tray and spread it in a single thin layer on the paper. The garlic will blacken and become crispier as it dries. You want it to dry and cool as quickly as possible to prevent it from getting too dark and bitter. It takes a bit of practice, but you’ll quickly realize how dark you want the garlic to be before you strain it.

    Step 10

    Let the fried garlic cool completely before storing it in an airtight container covered with a sheet of paper towel. Store in a cool, dry place for up to two weeks. Let the fragrant garlic oil cool completely before transferring it to a separate airtight container. It will keep in a cool, dry place for up to two months. After the fried garlic and fragrant garlic oil are completely cooled, you can make a condiment by adding one part crispy fried garlic flakes to two parts fragrant oil. It is ideal for seasoning noodle soups, fried rice and rice porridge at the table.

  • Make the sweet fish sauce

    Step 11

    For the sweet fish sauce, heat the palm sugar and water in a large saucepan over low heat until the sugar is completely dissolved. Add the shrimp paste, fish sauce, cassia bark, star anise and dried chilies, then bring to a boil and cook for 5 minutes or until slightly reduced. Test the consistency by spreading a small amount on a plate and putting it in the fridge for a few minutes. The desirable consistency should be sticky and sticky but not too firm. Simmer longer or add water if needed to get the right consistency.

  • Do the Gai Yang

    Step 12

    Pound the white peppercorns and salt in a pestle and mortar until a fine powder is obtained, then add the coriander root and garlic and mash until a smooth paste is obtained. Add the sugar, turmeric, ground coriander, fish sauce and oil, and mix until combined and smooth.

    Step 13

    Using a sturdy pair of scissors, cut the chicken along the backbone to spatchcock the bird. Place the chicken, breast side up, on a cutting board. Gently, but with some authority, press down on the chicken with the palm of your hand to flatten it. This will allow it to cook evenly on your charcoal grill.

    Step 14

    Rub marinade all over chicken, coat well, then marinate in refrigerator for at least 6 hours or overnight.

    Step 15

    When you’re ready to cook, set up a charcoal grill, then cook the chicken over medium heat for 15-20 minutes, until cooked through. To do this, start by placing the exposed cavity side of the chicken on the grill and cook for two-thirds of the cooking time; the bones will protect the delicate white flesh from overcooking and drying out. Flip the chicken over so it is breast side down and cook for the last third of the cooking time to color the skin a golden brown. Let the chicken rest in a warm place for 5 minutes.

    Step 16

    Before serving, use a pastry brush to generously coat the chicken with the sweet fish sauce. Transfer to a cutting board and cut into pieces. I would suggest slicing the chicken in half down the middle of the breastbone and removing the thighs, then separating the thighs and thighs across the joint. Remove the small drumsticks and wings, then cut the breast across the bone into 2 or 3 pieces. Serve with papaya salad and/or sticky rice.

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    source : https://folobooks.com/

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